Safety tips for internet dating sites

The internet provides us all with huge benefits, but it's not only our kids who are at risk online. Make sure you're up to speed on the potential danger areas and how to protect yourself.

The internet offers a wealth of resources and serves as a convenience for all.

The situation felt menacing — would I find a rabbit stew boiling on the stove? Certain queries can reveal a lot of info in a short amount of time about a person you've just met. As I learned the hard way with my would-be Glenn Close, it's unwise to welcome anyone into your abode unless you know them well.

— so I summoned my next-door neighbor, a woman, for help. There isn't much privacy, but you'll be grateful for the presence of others if an unpleasant situation develops. I once had a coffee date with a woman who grew increasingly angry — and vocal — over her mistreatment by an ex-boyfriend. If a coffee date shows up with a bad attitude, a bad temper or a foul mouth, head for the door. You might ask, for example, if your date has close friends: A "yes" indicates he or she is capable of connecting with others; a "no" suggests a lack of intimacy skills. If you're unsure, consider asking another couple to join you.

In any setting she looks for the social value in a man.

After all, most dates that start online end up in either a love connection or with the two of you going your separate ways.

Would you post a photo of you standing in front of your new car – with the license plate showing in the background?

Here are some tips for managing your relationships online: Suppose you got a new car.

I was walking on California's Stinson Beach in August 2009 when I struck up a conversation with a woman who seemed utterly delightful.

Captivated, I invited her to dinner at my house that evening. While I ate my dinner, she drank hers — then refused to leave. My acquaintance of 12 hours bizarrely insisted that we were living together.

The series has been a huge success and we thank you for everything you do to protect our families.

" — Tim Clinton, President, American Association of Christian Counselors (AACC) (EIE) and its work to protect children online.

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